Enter the 14th Annual Shorty Awards

The Shorty Awards honor the best of social media and digital. See categories below. The regular entry deadline is on February 10th, 2022.

From the 8th Annual Shorty Awards Best Vine Artist

This artist has found unique and beautiful ways to showcase their work on Vine. Whether they’re stop motion geniuses, calligraphy and illustration masters or installation artists with a grand vision -- these artists are using Vine creatively.

Brand entries using social media in this space can be found in the Best in Vine Shorty Award.

Finalists

finalist
Alex Draws
Almost exclusively comprised of detailed closeups of his geometric doodles, the vines of Alex Evans track the building of tiny cities, shapes, moonscapes, and abstractions, in timelapses, stills, stop motion, and macro video. Using the ultra-precise Staedtler 0.05m pen, the vines of Alex’s art are meditative and often coupled with simple, glitchtr…
finalist
Gerald Andal
Gerald Andal and his button-up-and-tie alter ego RGB star in part hand-drawn, part animated, part live-action vines, including occasional cameos from Andal’s golden retriever Hudson. Gerald’s frenetic, glitchy, dance-filled style pairs him well with other Vine artists, with which he frequently collaborates, using the hashtag #unPOPcollab for the U…
finalist
Kayla Christine
Kayla Christine wasn’t about to let Crohn’s disease get in the way of her adventurous spirit. She founded Earth Habit, documenting her two-month adventure through the forests of Oregon, which she extended indefinitely. With support from GoFundMe, she uses her Vine account as a platform for her subdued, sleepy, hipster traipses through the woods. S…
finalist
Meagan Cignoli
Labeled the reigning “queen of branded vines," Meagan Cignoli’s frenetic and enthralling stop-motion videos have led her to work on six-second spots for Google, GE, Veuve Clicquot, Ikea, and Disney. Emerging as a trained Manhattan photographer losing inspiration in traditional photography, she channeled her artistic ennui into stop motion on Vine …
finalist
Reno Shaw
Reno Shaw’s Vine art (he’d tell you not to call it art) could be: a parody of French performance art, sketch comedy, cat antics, typography video, moving sculpture, or a passionate plea for sponsorship. His clever shadow- and word-art vines have given him a loyal following and annoyed him to no end. While other artists on social media may stick wi…

Nominees

DannyBGo!
An Editor’s Pick on Vine this year, Danny Gonzalez’s work evolved over the course of 2015, maturing from what was once a dancey, low-budget parody of the Vine art genre to more thoughtful, complex scenes. He’s known for simple, somber setups and darkly funny turns, usually incorporating music and riffing off the lyrics or beat. Being a newly minted Vine sta…
Evan Hilton
Evan Hilton, one of the winners of the Tribeca Film Festival’s 6 Second Film Award, is already blowing up on Vine, landing the chance to produce spots for Qualcomm’s smartwatches, HP, Microsoft, Miracle-Gro, and a camping-themed Vine series for Honda. A self-taught animator, Evan learned the art through Vine’s app and landed an animation on The Food Network…
Lawrence Becker
Snow with a mind of its own, sentient food that makes itself— Lawrence Becker’s vines animate the world by mixing mediums: showcasing the 10,000 hours of experience Lawrence has compiled over the years. In 2014, he was the winner of Tribeca’s #6SecFilm contest for his stop-motion piece of a man getting possessed by a malevolent snowball. Hand drawn animatio…
Noah Kalina
This isn’t how most people use Vine. Noah Kalina, first famous for his Everyday viral video of years of selfies stitched together (still ongoing), specializes in a hazy, meditative, sometimes-so-subtle-it’s-creepy nature photography. His subdued style is showcased in the coffee table book Cabin Porn, featuring photography of building inspiration in upstate …
molehill
London-based, self-professed creator of “sketchy, arty stuff," Emily Mulhall, aka Molehill, creates animations by combining video and overlaid pencil drawings, using what she calls amateur techniques, though the results are nothing amateurish. Her Vine account reads like a moving sketchbook, energetic and nature-inspired. These animation got her a video col…
yelldesign
Helmer of Melbourne-based social media studio yelldesign, Matt Willis produces Vine ads for Bank of America, Twitter, Pepsi, BBC, Microsoft, and Samsung, all while maintaining an aesthetic that is entirely his own, one that many have come to imitate online. The style is bright pastels, strange inanimate objects—like food or tech or paper—coming to life, wit…